International Conference

Posted by Yusuf on July 14th, 2014 — Posted in News

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Many communities with rare languages opt to integrate into mainstream culture, leaving behind part of his idiosyncrasies. According to the UN, there are 6,000 languages surveyed in the planet, of which more than 2,500 are in danger. Oceania and America, continents with more languages at risk of disappearing. Globalization and the pressure on indigenous communities by joining the dominant culture are accelerating the disappearance of hundreds of languages around the world, representing more than a loss of words the destruction of a way of seeing life, according to experts gathered in Quito. Of the 6,000 languages surveyed in the planet, more than 2,500 are at risk of fading away, according to the Organization of the UN Educational, scientific and Cultural (Organization Unesco).

These include, for example, the Ecuadorian ava, which is just a speaker, and the zapara, that six elderly dominate. With them will be hopelessly lost natural knowledge, as well as a way to conceive the space, the universe and relationship with other human beings, stressed Marleen Haboud, the Coordinator of an International Conference on the subject that was held this week at the Catholic University of Quito. For example, the mohawk, the language of an indigenous tribe of the Confederacy iroquois who lives between United States and Canada, does not follow the traditional structure of subject, verb and predicate, which is the basis of the English or the Spanish. Its speakers placed first the information that they believe that it is more important for the listener, regardless of whether it is a name, an adjective or an action, explained Marianne Mithun, an American linguist who for decades help to recover that language. Different languages show the different ways in which the human mind can encode, understand and systematize the world, experience, and are ways that never occur to us if we only speak a European language, believed Mithun.

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